Home » culture » artificial short-term memories in isolated brain tissue, truck corral, groucho marx and t.s. eliot walk into a bar

artificial short-term memories in isolated brain tissue, truck corral, groucho marx and t.s. eliot walk into a bar

Mnemonic representations of transient stimuli and temporal sequences in the rodent hippocampus in vitro. What scientists have managed to do is take data and store it in, not the brain proper of a living organism, but brain tissue, much like data is stored on a hard drive and store it on a removable USB drive. One of the ramifications of this is yet another empirical reason to distance notions about non-mechanical or mythical qualities from brain activity. It further drills down to consciousness as consisting of properties of organic and genetic directives. Reactions and pathways which nature has experimented with for millions of years to arrive at something that does what we call thinking. Instead of scientists experimenting with silicon or quantum dots that store data, nature used polypeptides and nucleic acids. The non-organic and organic are both made of macromolecules that behave in a way to produce the desired effect.

western sky

truck corral wallpaper

This is one way to save print as a medium, Turn print magazines into readable t-shirts. They’re actually producing a magazine printed on a t-shirt so its like an idea that might work – though they might not get enough subscribers to survive as a business model – so it is not a far-fetched idea. I could envision shirts and blouses with some micro-fiction on the front pocket. A photo and a longer journalism piece on the back. A photo essay on the left sleeve and a short story on the right. As long as the type contrasted well enough with the background and the font as readable. Some people might even like it better as fashion than media. I did not save the link from another article about newspapers and magazines, because in a long article it only had one good point to make, that print media may have become or soon will become ironic just because print, especially newspapers are cumbersome.

“At the bus station.” Durham, North Carolina. May 1940. Jack Delano, photographer. The segregated waiting room is easy to see. Though also interesting are the advertisements on the wall. One of them reads, “Hitler’s Love Life Revealed as told by his maid”.

The Age of Trolling – How a small band of conservatives generated half of the Democratic Convention’s headlines. It is amazing how some twisted and greatly exaggerated doggerel about the capital of Israel and four words on U.S. currency became such a big news item. Since the unofficial motto of the U.S. was used by the Founders ( e pluribus unum or Out of many, one), and  conservatives say is what the country should return originalism or at least their fetishist version of the Founders, than shouldn’t e pluribus unum be the only motto on our currency.  Senator Sherrod Brown(D-OH) : What It’s Like to Fight Against $15 Million in Right-Wing Election Money. Still have not figured out how democracy is served by legislators being elected on the basis of who has the richest crazy sugar daddies.

the house republicans built

What happens when Groucho Marx and T.S. Eliot walk into a bar?

Eliot was “able to place his anti-Semitism at the service of his art. Anti-Semitism supplied part of the material out of which he created poetry.” And not just his poetry. In polemics like “After Strange Gods” and “The Idea of a Christian Society”, Eliot elaborated his belief that Jews had no place in modern life.

Enter Groucho, whose wit was as uniquely Jewish as it was universally comic. Where Eliot was the famous defender of tradition, order and civilised taste, the crux of Groucho’s humour was flouting tradition, fomenting chaos and outraging taste. “I have had a perfectly wonderful evening,” he once said to a host, “but this wasn’t it.”

Groucho and Eliot corresponded regularly from 1961 to 1964.

A long clip from The Marx Brother’s “Duck Soup”. Groucho has the mustache of course. The humor is a little dated, but still clever.

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